Los Angeles / Orange County Libraries
9Jan/120

New Books in PsycBooks

Three new books were added to the PsycBooks database in December.  In addition, 60 classic texts were added.  A complete list is available here.  For help in accessing the PsycBooks database, click here.

 Here are the 3 new books:

 The Conscious Body, by Perrin Elisha, PhD.  (2010)

 In The Conscious Body: A Psychoanalytic Exploration of the Body in Therapy, Perrin Elisha, PhD, delves into the underlying bias in psychology and psychotherapy that views the mind and body as separate, and that views the mind as having a higher status than the body in all contexts. In pointing out this consistent bias, Elisha confronts the broader fact that most people in Western contemporary culture—psychologists as well as lay people—have come to think of psychological space, what we think of as consciousness, as somehow not really being located in the body.

Violence Against Women and Children, volume 1, Mapping the Terrain.  Edited by Jacquelyn W. White, PhD; Mary P. Koss, PhD; and Alan E. Kazdin, PhD (2010).

 In this first of a two part book, experts from diverse disciplines describe prevalence rates among various populations; risk factors for perpetration and vulnerability and protective factors for potential victims. They also document the impact of violence on the victims in terms of psychological, reproductive, maternal and child health, and behavioral and economic consequences. In the process, they establish commonalities across child abuse, sexual and domestic violence, and suggest vital next steps for collaborative efforts.

Violence Against Women and Children, volume 2, Navigating Solutions.  Edited by Jacquelyn W. White, PhD; Mary P. Koss, PhD; and Alan E. Kazdin, PhD (2010).

In this volume, eminent scholars use a public health model to examine current societal responses to interpersonal violence. Authors examine the efficacy of medical and psychological treatments for victims, families, and perpetrators, as well as justice system responses to various forms of child abuse, sexual violence, and domestic violence. Interventions are suggested at several levels of prevention, including initiatives designed to eradicate the problem (primary prevention), reduce it among those at risk (secondary prevention), and minimize the negative consequences of violence and stabilize health (tertiary prevention). Finally, the editors present an integrative conclusion that provides a sound foundation for future responses across practice, research, advocacy and policy, at the local and national level.

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