Los Angeles / Orange County Libraries
27Jan/140

New Books in PsycBooks

Here are the new books recently added to our PsycBooks database:

Activities for Teaching Positive Psychology: A Guide for Instructors 2012  Edited by Jeffrey J. Froh, PsyD and Acacia C. Parks, PhD

“Positive psychology is a rapidly expanding area of study that is of great interest to students at the graduate, undergraduate, and high school levels. But the field is so broad that teachers who want to cover all the bases when designing a positive psychology course may have difficulty locating and selecting materials.  Activities for Teaching Positive Psychology addresses this problem by presenting a comprehensive set of fun, interactive classroom activities devised by contributors who are experienced teachers as well as leading scholars in their areas.”

  Controversy in the Psychology Classroom: Using Hot Topics to Foster Critical Thinking  2012  Edited by Dana S. Dunn, PhD; Regan A. R. Gurung, PhD; Karen Z. Naufel, PhD; and Janie H. Wilson, PhD

“This book provides frameworks for teaching controversial topics and skills for handling disruptions, so teachers can help students evaluate evidence and develop testable questions.”

  Health and Social Relationships: The Good, The Bad, and The Complicated  2012  Edited by Matthew L. Newman, PhD and Nicole A. Roberts, PhD

“The contributors to Health and Social Relationships not only examine the psychological and physiological linkages between relationships and health, but also offer clinical implications — such as how to foster good social relationships in our personal lives and in our communities at large.”

  Presurgical Psychological Screening: Understanding Patients, Improving Outcomes  2012  Edited by Andrew R. Block, PhD, ABPP and David B. Sarwer, PhD

“The success of many surgical procedures depends not only on the skill of the surgeon and the use of state-of-the-art technology, but also on the actions and characteristics of the patient. Patients' emotional and psychosocial concerns, health-related behaviors, outcome expectations, and compliance with treatment regimen can all strongly influence the ultimate effectiveness of surgery.  Thus, mental health professionals are increasingly called upon to perform presurgical psychological screening (PPS) to ensure that patients are given the treatments most likely to be effective, while reducing the chances of worsening their conditions.  This book presents PPS procedures for a wide range of surgery types, such as spinal surgery, organ transplantation, bariatric surgery, and plastic surgery. Drawing on both research and clinical experience, the authors explain how to conduct PPS, communicate results to patients and surgeons, and identify possible pre- or postsurgery interventions to mitigate risk factors and maximize the likelihood of surgical success.”

 Understanding and Treating Pathological Narcissism  2012  Edited by John S. Ogrodniczuk, PhD

“In this book, today's most prominent thinkers and clinical experts on pathological narcissism address the challenges facing therapists who work with narcissistic patients. They trace the history of our understanding of narcissism, from ancient myth, to Freud and subsequent psychodynamic approaches and also provide clinicians with a comprehensive guide to treatment that covers features of the disorder, diagnosis, and assessment, as well as special considerations in the vital areas of transference and countertransference.”

  Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use in the Workforce and Workplace  2012  By Michael R. Frone, PhD

“In this authoritative book, Michael R. Frone takes a close look at what we know and don't know about workforce and workplace substance involvement. In doing so, he exposes the lack of evidence behind many popular myths that have persisted since the "war on drugs" began in the 1980s.”

  Authoritative Parenting: Synthesizing Nurturance and Discipline for Optimal Child Development  2012  Edited by Robert E. Larzelere, PhD; Amanda Sheffield Morris, PhD; and Amanda W. Harrist, PhD

“In this book, leading scholars update our thinking about authoritative parenting and address three unresolved issues: mechanisms of the style's effectiveness, variations of effectiveness across cultures, and untangling how parents influence children from how children influence them.”

  Spiritual Interventions in Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy  2012  Edited by Donald F. Walker, PhD and William L. Hathaway, PhD

“This book presents guidance for integrating spiritual interventions in psychotherapy with children and their families. The interventions are appropriate for a range of settings, presenting problems, and client belief systems. Specific chapters address the use of prayer, forgiveness, acceptance, spiritual awareness, sacred texts, and God images in therapy. Illustrative case studies are included, and ethical issues are given special consideration.”

Cognition and Brain Development: Converging Evidence From Various Methodologies  2013  Edited by Bhoomika Rastogi Kar, PhD

‘In this book, an elite group of international contributors presents the latest advances in the science of cognitive development.”

Internationalizing Multiculturalism: Expanding Professional Competencies in a Globalized World  2013  Edited by Rodney L. Lowman, PhD

“This book broadens the concept of multiculturalism to encompass internationalism. In other words, it internationalizes multiculturalism. It argues that professionals in all fields can enhance both their multicultural and international competence to perform more effectively.”

The Psychology of Meaning  2013  Edited by Keith D. Markman, PhD; Travis Proulx, PhD; and Matthew J. Lindberg, PhD

The Psychology of Meaning explores the multifaceted nature of this highly subjective construct. The volume's contributors examine meaning along five dimensions — the architecture of meaning, responding to uncertainty, meaning from retrospection, compensating for meaning violations, and restoring meaning: physiological and neurocognitive mechanisms.”

28Apr/120

New Streaming Videos

Chicago has been really busy adding new streaming videos to the catalog.  There are 12 new streaming videos available to watch.  Click on "Finding Guides" on the right side of this page to fine the updated list of titles and a guide to using streaming video.  When trying to access a video, if you are taken to the “Films on Demand” page and asked for another user ID and password use thechicagoschool as the ID and digital as the password.  Here are the new titles:

 Love & Diane (2002) In the 1980s, the crack epidemic in American inner cities left a generation of parents addicted and their children in a cycle of foster care and group homes. This film documents one New York City family’s struggle to become a family again ten years after their initial separation. Focuses on Diane, a former addict, and her daughter, Love, who is HIV positive and fighting for custody of her newborn son.

 Prejudice: more than black & white (2007)   Muslims, blacks, gays, people with disabilities, and immigrants of every ethnicity and color: they and many other groups have stood in the spotlight glare of intolerance, easy targets for every sort of discrimination and violence. What makes people prone to irrational hate, and what steps can individuals and society take to eradicate it? In this program, psychology professors Susan Fiske and Mahzarin Banaji share their insights and experiences. A pro-gay Baptist minister who formerly took a biblical stance against homosexuality and an ex-imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan who now speaks out for tolerance also offer their views.

 If I Could (2006)  Documentary film about a family’s effort to escape the effects of trauma after decades of abuse, abandonment, drugs, and rage. Follows the life of Tracy, a single mother fighting to keep her son from falling prey to the same problems that almost destroyed her through intervention of a program called VisionQuest.

Self esteem and identity in the digital age  (2009)  The program examines how we develop our own identity, what influences the development of our identity, and the key factors in the development of positive and negative self-esteem. Empowers and educates students in the face of a powerful cultural force.

 Rage (2006)  Explores the emotional causes and social dangers of short fuses, linking the pressures of a hard-driving, high-tech world to the prevalence of an easily threatened, easily angered point of view.

 Divide of the sexes  (2008)  Why do boys underachieve? How does celebrity culture influence the self-esteem of young girls? In an atmosphere dominated by sex and consumerism, are children growing up too quickly? This program addresses those issues, reporting on a group of 25 eight-year olds as they adjust to gender roles and expectations. An episode of Child of Our Time, which focuses on a group of millennium babies and follows their physical and emotional development as they grow into adulthood.

 Conformity: in the real-life lab (2006)  Recreates a lab experiment by Dr. Gregory Berns on how and why people "follow the pack." Sequences with subjects in candid-camera style settings are backed up with the results of MRI experiments that study brain activity.

 Cut up kids: the epidemic of self-harm  (2008)  For reasons still being explored, a growing number of children, teenagers, and; young adults regularly and willfully cut, burn, and otherwise harm their own bodies. This films follow three young people as they confront the violence they have inflcted upon themselves

 Love, lust and marriage: why we stay and why we stray (2003)  How do people find love, why do they fall in love, and once married, how do they stay in love? In this ABC News special with correspondent John Stossel, the modern-day notion of love, with all of its attendant expectations, is examined. Despite divorce rates that are currently holding steady at 50 percent, research shows that married couples are actually healthier -- and claim to be happier as well. Also discussed are what can make a marriage fail and other cultures’ solutions to "the dating game," such as arranged marriages

 Cyberbullies   2006  Uses dramatizations and question and answer sessions to prevent children and teenagers from being bullied by others when using chat rooms, blogs, and instant messaging. Describes possible responses to such abuse and explains the legal issues involving privacy and libel.

 Insights into violence  2003  Examines the many manifestations of violence, from sports to murder and genocide; how societies harvest violence; and how the latest research reveals that violence might have served a necessary function for group survival that continues in our genetic make-up today.

 Obeying or resisting authority: a psychological retrospective  2007  “Echoing the infamous Milgram experiment from the 1960s, this ABC News program sets up a psychological test in which an authority figure urges men and women to inflict pain. Test administrator and social psychologist Dr. Jerry Burger interprets the disturbing findings. The program also analyzes the 1971 Stanford prison experiment as well as the 2004 hoax in which a McDonald’s manager and her fiancé--directed by a caller impersonating a police officer-- strip-searched and abused an employee. Original footage from all of these occurrences is included, along with present-day commentary from Dr. Philip Zimbardo, who designed the Stanford test. Finally, the program explores the ethics of using human participants in psychological tests”

8Feb/110

New Streaming Videos

We have two new streaming videos available online through the TCS catalog.   If you don't know how to access the streaming videos, click on our Finding Guide Page on this blog for a step by step guide. 

Do I drink too much?: human biology, genetics, and alcohol     53 minutes

 "Why does tolerance for alcohol differ so widely from person to person? Do genetic factors make alcoholism unavoidable in some people? Should we drink at all? This program searches for answers, following addiction expert Dr. John Marsden as he observes--and participates in--experiments that assess alcohol’s neurological and physiological impact. After exploring basic chemical and evolutionary concepts, Marsden visits London’s Institute of Psychiatry, where brain scans, genetic testing, and psychological profiling shed light on alcohol addiction. In the U.S., Marsden goes inside the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to study other genetic markers, while moving toward a greater understanding of alcoholism in his own family history."--Container.

 Pills: never enough!       52 minutes 

"This program illustrates a growing appetite for-- and dependence on-- experience-enhancing pharmaceuticals and nutriceuticals among those who have the money, the connections, or the savvy to procure them. Drawing examples from the U.S. and France, Pills: Never Enough! examines the use of dietary supplements augmented by hormones to slow the effects of aging; the consumption of energy drinks such as the controversial Cocaine, which packs the caffeine punch of eight espressos per; the abuse of Prozac and sleep disorder med Modafinil by employees striving to work better and longer; the abuse of Ritalin and Concerta by students trying to improve their grades; and abuse of OxyContin, Xanax, and other prescription meds at "pharming parties," just for kicks. The abuse of ED meds Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra is given special attention, emphasizing their obvious value to the porn industry and their inclusion in chemical cocktails downed at gay sex clubs"--Container.

   

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