Los Angeles / Orange County Libraries
15Sep/110

New Books in PsycBooks

Our PsycBooks database added the 7 new titles below to its database in August.  In addition, it added 20 classic titles.  A full list is available here.

  Cognitive Fatigue: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Current Research and Future Applications (2010)  Edited by Phillip L. Ackerman, PhD.

 A balance of theoretical and empirical research, reviewed from several different countries, makes this a truly multinational and interdisciplinary collection. Each chapter concludes with a lively discussion among authors, and the book itself concludes with a provocative open panel discussion regarding promising avenues for research and application.

Essential Ethics for Psychologists: A Primer for Understanding and Mastering Core Issues (2010)  by Thomas F. Nagy, PhD

This one-of-a-kind book acculturates the reader into ethical practice in psychology by enhancing critical thinking skills. Rather than explain each of the 80+ standards of the APA Ethics Code, the book examines the code's underlying principles.

Ethical Practice in Operational Psychology: Military and National Intelligence Applications (2010)  Edited by Carrie H. Kennedy, PhD, ABPP and Thomas J. Williams, PhD

This book integrates the requirements of the existing APA Ethics Code and other relevant professional guidelines and protocols within the limited professional literature in the field.  The editors have assembled some of the best operational psychologists in the field today to share their expertise and experience. The contributors provide realistic case examples, practical guidance, and recommendations regarding the unique ethical issues that confront operational psychologists, shedding much needed light on how and why military and public safety practices differ from traditional psychological practice.

Human Aggression and Violence: Causes, Manifestations, and Consequences (2010)  Edited by Phillip R. Shaver, PhD and Mario Mikulincer, PhD

The tone of this book is realistic in its investigation of violence as an inherent part of human genetics and interaction, but hopeful in its exploration of research-based interventions aimed at reducing violence in future generations. In its assessment of aggression and violence across individual, relational and societal levels, this book will engage a broad audience.

  Narcissism and Machiavellianism in Youth: Implications for the Development of Adaptive and Maladaptive Behavior   (2010)  Edited by Christopher T. Barry, PhD; Patricia K. Kerig, PhD; Kurt K. Stellwagen, PhD; and Tammy D. Barry, PhD

This book highlights how knowledge of both narcissism and Machiavellianism may influence problematic youth social interactions as well as youth adaptation to developmental contexts such as peer relationships. The book brings together for the first time scholars who have empirically examined the emotional, social, and behavioral correlates of these constructs in youth.

Reproductive Trauma: Psychotherapy With Infertility and Pregnancy Loss Clients  (2010)  By Janet Jaffe, PhD and Martha O. Diamond, PhD

Written by specialists in the field of reproductive counseling, this volume will help clinicians to understand and effectively treat the unique needs of clients who have experienced adverse reproductive events, which include infertility, miscarriage, perinatal or newborn loss, and premature or other complicated births.

Short-Term Group Therapies for Complicated Grief: Two Research-Based Models  (2010)  By William E. Piper, PhD; John S. Ogrodniczuk, PhD; Anthony S. Joyce, PhD; and Rene Weideman, PhD

Although a certain amount of grief is expected and normal following the loss of a loved one, many people experience particularly intense and/or long-lasting grief, or complicated grief (CG). Up to 20% of acutely bereaved individuals and 33% of psychiatric outpatients suffer from CG. Furthermore, as the baby boom generation ages, the number of people experiencing CG will likely increase.  This book begins with a meticulous, comprehensive review of research related to CG, including prevalence, risk factors, effects of patient characteristics and group composition on therapeutic outcome, and mechanisms of change in group therapies for CG. The chapters also describe how the two models were developed and tested. Finally, the book explains how to administer the models, including assessing patients, forming groups, preparing group members for treatment, and running and terminating the group.

4May/110

New Books in PsycBOOKS

The following recent books were added to the PsycBOOKS database in April. In addition, 20 classic books from the late 19th and 20th centuries were also added.  A complete list is available here

 Clinical Hypnosis for Pain Control  by David R. Patterson

 This book makes the argument for hypnosis over medication.

 Emotions, aggression, and morality in children  by Arsenio and Lemerise

 This book demonstrates how early affective experiences and relationships provide a foundation for children's subsequent social cognitive understanding of victimization, harm, and moral intentionality.

 Evidence-based treatment of personality dysfunction.  Edited by Jeffrey Magnavita

 This volume is a collection of the most up-to-date research on personality disorder treatment written by leading scholars of psychopathology and psychotherapy. Organized by different therapeutic approaches, each chapter presents a theoretical framework, evidence-based methods, and clinical examples.

  Grief in childhood  by  Michelle Y. Pearlman, PhD; Karen D'Angelo Schwalbe, PhD; and Marylène Cloitre, PhD

 This book presents Integrated Grief Therapy for Children—an evidence-based model for treating bereaved children that draws extensively on cognitive–behavioral, family systems, and narrative approaches to therapy.

2Aug/100

Is the Pain From Grief “Normal?” Changes in DSM 5

This morning's Morning Edition on NPR had a story highlighting a new controversy coming out of the DSM 5 revisions.  This controversy focusses on the proposed removal of the "bereavement exception" from a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder.  Under DSM-IV, patients showing depressive symptoms which may have been caused by the loss of a loved one are not diagnosed or treated as depressed unless the symptoms continue for several months after the loss.  The proposed change for DSM 5 would allow patients to be diagnosed and treated if the symptoms last longer than 2 weeks.  Some people oppose the change and argue that grief is normal and may be beneficial.  They are concerned about the "overmedicalizing" of our experiences.

   

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