Los Angeles / Orange County Libraries
2Jul/120

New PsycBooks

PsycBooks has added 8 new titles and 56 classic titles to the database.   A complete list can be found here.  Below are the 8 new titles.  A guide to using PsycBooks, one of the EBSCO databases, can be found by clicking on ""Finding Guides" on the right side of this page.

Bilingualism and Cognition: Informing Research, Pedagogy, and Policy  2011.  By Eugene E. García, PhD and José E. Náñez, Sr., PhD

“Bridging the fields of cognitive psychology and education, this volume presents research-based knowledge on language acquisition and learning to leverage the strengths and achievements of bilingual children. By understanding the neurocognitive mechanisms of the bilingual brain and the need for socioculturally inclusive pedagogy, educational researchers and practitioners can better serve this rapidly growing population.”

  Malpractice in Psychology: A Practical Resource for Clinicians  2011  By David L. Shapiro, PhD and Steven R. Smith, JD

Many mental health practitioners fear malpractice suits. Besides obtaining the appropriate insurance, clinicians should understand the risks of lawsuits and implement risk management strategies to avoid unfounded malpractice claims and decrease the likelihood of being sued successfully.  With combined expertise in psychotherapy and law, Shapiro and Smith expertly navigate you through the unfamiliar territories of professional liability, negligence, informed consent, privacy and confidentiality, HIPAA, defamation, violence and suicide, and trials and settlements.

   Self-Regulation: Brain, Cognition, and Development  2011  By Andrea Berger, PhD

This book presents self-regulation as a crucial link between genetic predisposition, early experience, and later adult functioning in society. Individual chapters examine what self-regulation is, how it functions, how genetic and environmental factors influence its development, how it affects social and academic competence in childhood and adulthood, what pathologies can emerge if it is under-developed, and how it might be fostered in children.

  Coparenting: A Conceptual and Clinical Examination of Family Systems  2011  Edited by James P. McHale, PhD and Kristin M. Lindahl, PhD

This landmark book was written to encourage good coparenting as a powerful support for at-risk children's social, emotional, and behavioral needs.  Part I examines the concepts, theories, and empirical research underlying this dynamic socialization force characteristic of all family systems. Part II explores clinical applications—the various assessments and interventions that promote coparenting. The result is essential reading for those interested in the welfare of children.

  Couples Therapy for Domestic Violence: Finding Safe Solutions   2011   By Sandra M. Stith, PhD; Eric E. McCollum, PhD; and Karen H. Rosen, EdD        This book is currently being used in Dr. Sorrell’s MM636 class.

This book presents a safety-focused approach to assessment and treatment of couples who choose to remain together after one or both partners have been violent.  Treatment options for intimate partner violence have evolved alongside the growing awareness and broader definitions of domestic violence. Since 1997 the authors have conducted Domestic Violence Focused Couples Treatment (DVFCT), collected data, and refined their program. The authors outline their assessment and screening process and share case illustrations to demonstrate when conjoint treatment can be a safe and viable option.

  High-Stakes Testing in Education: Science and Practice in K–12 Settings   2011  Edited by James A. Bovaird, PhD; Kurt F. Geisinger, PhD; and Chad W. Buckendahl, PhD

This volume covers a selection of contemporary issues about testing science and practice that impact the nation's public education system, including local and state assessment development, assessing special populations, charter schools, and the role of college placement and entrance examinations. Also featured is a section focusing on validation practices, defining, and interpreting resulting test scores. Specific topics include the role of examinee motivation, obtaining and making decisions based on validity evidence, evidence of consequences, and considering contextual sampling effects when evaluating validity evidence.

   Shame in the Therapy Hour  2011   Edited by Ronda L. Dearing, PhD and June Price Tangney, PhD

This book explores the manifestations of shame and presents several approaches for treatment. It brings together the insights of master clinicians from different theoretical and practice orientations, such as psychodynamics, object relations, emotion-focused therapy, functional analysis, group therapy, family therapy, and couples therapy.  The chapters address all aspects of shame, including how it develops, how it relates to psychological difficulties, how to recognize it, and how to help clients resolve it. Strategies for dealing with therapist shame are also provided, since therapist shame can be triggered during sessions and can complicate the therapeutic alliance.

  Working With Narrative in Emotion-Focused Therapy: Changing Stories, Healing Lives  2011  By Lynne E. Angus, PhD and Leslie S. Greenberg, PhD

In psychotherapy, as in life, all significant emotions are embedded in important stories, and all significant stories revolve around important emotional themes. Yet, despite the interaction between emotion and narrative processes, emotion-focused therapy (EFT) and narrative-informed therapies have evolved as separate clinical approaches. In this book, Lynne Angus and Leslie Greenberg address this gap and present a groundbreaking, empirically based model that integrates working with narrative and emotion processes in EFT.  According to Angus and Greenberg's narrative-informed approach to EFT, all successful psychotherapy entails the articulation, revision, and deconstruction of clients' maladaptive life stories in favor of more life-enhancing alternatives. Because emotions and narratives interact to form meaning and sense of self, the evocation and articulation of emotions is critical to changing life narratives.

28Apr/120

New Streaming Videos

Chicago has been really busy adding new streaming videos to the catalog.  There are 12 new streaming videos available to watch.  Click on "Finding Guides" on the right side of this page to fine the updated list of titles and a guide to using streaming video.  When trying to access a video, if you are taken to the “Films on Demand” page and asked for another user ID and password use thechicagoschool as the ID and digital as the password.  Here are the new titles:

 Love & Diane (2002) In the 1980s, the crack epidemic in American inner cities left a generation of parents addicted and their children in a cycle of foster care and group homes. This film documents one New York City family’s struggle to become a family again ten years after their initial separation. Focuses on Diane, a former addict, and her daughter, Love, who is HIV positive and fighting for custody of her newborn son.

 Prejudice: more than black & white (2007)   Muslims, blacks, gays, people with disabilities, and immigrants of every ethnicity and color: they and many other groups have stood in the spotlight glare of intolerance, easy targets for every sort of discrimination and violence. What makes people prone to irrational hate, and what steps can individuals and society take to eradicate it? In this program, psychology professors Susan Fiske and Mahzarin Banaji share their insights and experiences. A pro-gay Baptist minister who formerly took a biblical stance against homosexuality and an ex-imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan who now speaks out for tolerance also offer their views.

 If I Could (2006)  Documentary film about a family’s effort to escape the effects of trauma after decades of abuse, abandonment, drugs, and rage. Follows the life of Tracy, a single mother fighting to keep her son from falling prey to the same problems that almost destroyed her through intervention of a program called VisionQuest.

Self esteem and identity in the digital age  (2009)  The program examines how we develop our own identity, what influences the development of our identity, and the key factors in the development of positive and negative self-esteem. Empowers and educates students in the face of a powerful cultural force.

 Rage (2006)  Explores the emotional causes and social dangers of short fuses, linking the pressures of a hard-driving, high-tech world to the prevalence of an easily threatened, easily angered point of view.

 Divide of the sexes  (2008)  Why do boys underachieve? How does celebrity culture influence the self-esteem of young girls? In an atmosphere dominated by sex and consumerism, are children growing up too quickly? This program addresses those issues, reporting on a group of 25 eight-year olds as they adjust to gender roles and expectations. An episode of Child of Our Time, which focuses on a group of millennium babies and follows their physical and emotional development as they grow into adulthood.

 Conformity: in the real-life lab (2006)  Recreates a lab experiment by Dr. Gregory Berns on how and why people "follow the pack." Sequences with subjects in candid-camera style settings are backed up with the results of MRI experiments that study brain activity.

 Cut up kids: the epidemic of self-harm  (2008)  For reasons still being explored, a growing number of children, teenagers, and; young adults regularly and willfully cut, burn, and otherwise harm their own bodies. This films follow three young people as they confront the violence they have inflcted upon themselves

 Love, lust and marriage: why we stay and why we stray (2003)  How do people find love, why do they fall in love, and once married, how do they stay in love? In this ABC News special with correspondent John Stossel, the modern-day notion of love, with all of its attendant expectations, is examined. Despite divorce rates that are currently holding steady at 50 percent, research shows that married couples are actually healthier -- and claim to be happier as well. Also discussed are what can make a marriage fail and other cultures’ solutions to "the dating game," such as arranged marriages

 Cyberbullies   2006  Uses dramatizations and question and answer sessions to prevent children and teenagers from being bullied by others when using chat rooms, blogs, and instant messaging. Describes possible responses to such abuse and explains the legal issues involving privacy and libel.

 Insights into violence  2003  Examines the many manifestations of violence, from sports to murder and genocide; how societies harvest violence; and how the latest research reveals that violence might have served a necessary function for group survival that continues in our genetic make-up today.

 Obeying or resisting authority: a psychological retrospective  2007  “Echoing the infamous Milgram experiment from the 1960s, this ABC News program sets up a psychological test in which an authority figure urges men and women to inflict pain. Test administrator and social psychologist Dr. Jerry Burger interprets the disturbing findings. The program also analyzes the 1971 Stanford prison experiment as well as the 2004 hoax in which a McDonald’s manager and her fiancé--directed by a caller impersonating a police officer-- strip-searched and abused an employee. Original footage from all of these occurrences is included, along with present-day commentary from Dr. Philip Zimbardo, who designed the Stanford test. Finally, the program explores the ethics of using human participants in psychological tests”

21Mar/120

New Dissertations in the Westwood Library

 We have three new dissertations in the Westwood Library

 A substance abuse treatment plan for teenage mothers: an attachment theory perspective by Farzaneh Fay Talei

Complex traumatic stress: using movement to form an original treatment plan by Alexis Holz

An integrated communication treatment model designed to reduce anxiety, depression, and postraumatic stress with female victims of domestic violence  by Linda Pratt

Congratulations to all of you! 

Come check them out!

9Jan/120

New Books in PsycBooks

Three new books were added to the PsycBooks database in December.  In addition, 60 classic texts were added.  A complete list is available here.  For help in accessing the PsycBooks database, click here.

 Here are the 3 new books:

 The Conscious Body, by Perrin Elisha, PhD.  (2010)

 In The Conscious Body: A Psychoanalytic Exploration of the Body in Therapy, Perrin Elisha, PhD, delves into the underlying bias in psychology and psychotherapy that views the mind and body as separate, and that views the mind as having a higher status than the body in all contexts. In pointing out this consistent bias, Elisha confronts the broader fact that most people in Western contemporary culture—psychologists as well as lay people—have come to think of psychological space, what we think of as consciousness, as somehow not really being located in the body.

Violence Against Women and Children, volume 1, Mapping the Terrain.  Edited by Jacquelyn W. White, PhD; Mary P. Koss, PhD; and Alan E. Kazdin, PhD (2010).

 In this first of a two part book, experts from diverse disciplines describe prevalence rates among various populations; risk factors for perpetration and vulnerability and protective factors for potential victims. They also document the impact of violence on the victims in terms of psychological, reproductive, maternal and child health, and behavioral and economic consequences. In the process, they establish commonalities across child abuse, sexual and domestic violence, and suggest vital next steps for collaborative efforts.

Violence Against Women and Children, volume 2, Navigating Solutions.  Edited by Jacquelyn W. White, PhD; Mary P. Koss, PhD; and Alan E. Kazdin, PhD (2010).

In this volume, eminent scholars use a public health model to examine current societal responses to interpersonal violence. Authors examine the efficacy of medical and psychological treatments for victims, families, and perpetrators, as well as justice system responses to various forms of child abuse, sexual violence, and domestic violence. Interventions are suggested at several levels of prevention, including initiatives designed to eradicate the problem (primary prevention), reduce it among those at risk (secondary prevention), and minimize the negative consequences of violence and stabilize health (tertiary prevention). Finally, the editors present an integrative conclusion that provides a sound foundation for future responses across practice, research, advocacy and policy, at the local and national level.

15Sep/110

New Books in PsycBooks

Our PsycBooks database added the 7 new titles below to its database in August.  In addition, it added 20 classic titles.  A full list is available here.

  Cognitive Fatigue: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Current Research and Future Applications (2010)  Edited by Phillip L. Ackerman, PhD.

 A balance of theoretical and empirical research, reviewed from several different countries, makes this a truly multinational and interdisciplinary collection. Each chapter concludes with a lively discussion among authors, and the book itself concludes with a provocative open panel discussion regarding promising avenues for research and application.

Essential Ethics for Psychologists: A Primer for Understanding and Mastering Core Issues (2010)  by Thomas F. Nagy, PhD

This one-of-a-kind book acculturates the reader into ethical practice in psychology by enhancing critical thinking skills. Rather than explain each of the 80+ standards of the APA Ethics Code, the book examines the code's underlying principles.

Ethical Practice in Operational Psychology: Military and National Intelligence Applications (2010)  Edited by Carrie H. Kennedy, PhD, ABPP and Thomas J. Williams, PhD

This book integrates the requirements of the existing APA Ethics Code and other relevant professional guidelines and protocols within the limited professional literature in the field.  The editors have assembled some of the best operational psychologists in the field today to share their expertise and experience. The contributors provide realistic case examples, practical guidance, and recommendations regarding the unique ethical issues that confront operational psychologists, shedding much needed light on how and why military and public safety practices differ from traditional psychological practice.

Human Aggression and Violence: Causes, Manifestations, and Consequences (2010)  Edited by Phillip R. Shaver, PhD and Mario Mikulincer, PhD

The tone of this book is realistic in its investigation of violence as an inherent part of human genetics and interaction, but hopeful in its exploration of research-based interventions aimed at reducing violence in future generations. In its assessment of aggression and violence across individual, relational and societal levels, this book will engage a broad audience.

  Narcissism and Machiavellianism in Youth: Implications for the Development of Adaptive and Maladaptive Behavior   (2010)  Edited by Christopher T. Barry, PhD; Patricia K. Kerig, PhD; Kurt K. Stellwagen, PhD; and Tammy D. Barry, PhD

This book highlights how knowledge of both narcissism and Machiavellianism may influence problematic youth social interactions as well as youth adaptation to developmental contexts such as peer relationships. The book brings together for the first time scholars who have empirically examined the emotional, social, and behavioral correlates of these constructs in youth.

Reproductive Trauma: Psychotherapy With Infertility and Pregnancy Loss Clients  (2010)  By Janet Jaffe, PhD and Martha O. Diamond, PhD

Written by specialists in the field of reproductive counseling, this volume will help clinicians to understand and effectively treat the unique needs of clients who have experienced adverse reproductive events, which include infertility, miscarriage, perinatal or newborn loss, and premature or other complicated births.

Short-Term Group Therapies for Complicated Grief: Two Research-Based Models  (2010)  By William E. Piper, PhD; John S. Ogrodniczuk, PhD; Anthony S. Joyce, PhD; and Rene Weideman, PhD

Although a certain amount of grief is expected and normal following the loss of a loved one, many people experience particularly intense and/or long-lasting grief, or complicated grief (CG). Up to 20% of acutely bereaved individuals and 33% of psychiatric outpatients suffer from CG. Furthermore, as the baby boom generation ages, the number of people experiencing CG will likely increase.  This book begins with a meticulous, comprehensive review of research related to CG, including prevalence, risk factors, effects of patient characteristics and group composition on therapeutic outcome, and mechanisms of change in group therapies for CG. The chapters also describe how the two models were developed and tested. Finally, the book explains how to administer the models, including assessing patients, forming groups, preparing group members for treatment, and running and terminating the group.

18Mar/110

New Dissertations in the Westwood Library

  We have 5 new dissertations in the Westwood library!

   The effects of accepting the past on life satisfaction and successful aging in the elderly  by Afsaneh Ahooraiyan

Sandplay with Native Americans by Andrea Filoso

An examination of the relationship between caregiver fusion and recovery among opiate addicts  by Elizabeth Hatch

Exposure to community violence and the impact on children's psycho-social development  by Larisa Pikover

The relationship between acculturation, depression, and anxiety in first generation Armenians living in Los Angeles by Vahe Sukiasyan

Congratulations to all of you!

   

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